Some Thoughts On Process From Various Authors

“If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you’re doing.”

W. Edwards Deming

“The process and organization leading up to cooking the egg can tell you a lot about the cook.”

David Chang

“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.

Friedrich Nietzsche

“Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone.”

Alan W. Watts

“How you climb a mountain is more important than reaching the top.”

Yvon Chouinard

How To Watch The Ball Playing Tennis Part III

The third part of watching the ball in tennis is to watch the ball at the point of impact. Now I realize that you cannot actually see the ball hit your strings, but we must keep our eyes on the ball as long as possible. Most of you tennis players are saying to yourself, “I am watching it as long as I can.” How do we know if we are watching the ball long enough. I have heard other tennis professionals say to keep your head still and that is correct but how long do I keep my head still?

The answer to the question on a forehand is to keep your head still until your chin touches your shoulder. I like to overemphasize this and tell students to count 1001 after they hit a forehand. If your chin is not touching your shoulder you know that you are not making a proper follow through. Look at the illustration below:

Another little tidbit, if you are having trouble, imagine that you are hitting through three balls and this will help you extend your follow through and give you better control of your shot.

Some Thoughts On Process From Various Authors

“How you climb a mountain is more important than reaching the top.”

Yvon Chouinard

“I’m so involved in the process that sometimes at the end of a day, I can look at the piece on my desk and really wonder how it got there. At other times, I really have to struggle with a piece to turn it into what I had in mind. Sometimes, I give up and leave it half finished to work on something else. Then in a few days, when I come back to it, I can see what it wants to be… which sometimes is not at all what I had in mind. When I just let that happen, things seem to go more smoothly.”

Wendy Froud

“I am not concerned about results. The only thing I am concerned about is the process. How you tried to achieve something matters more than what you achieved.”

Sharad Vivek Sagar

“Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone.”

Alan W. Watts

“If the path be beautiful, let us not ask where it leads.”

Anatole France

Some Thoughts On Motivation To Change From Various Authors

“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.”

Viktor E. Frankl

“When someone tells me “no,” it doesn’t mean I can’t do it, it simply means I can’t do it with them.”

Karen E. Quinones Miller

“The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson

“When defeat comes, accept it as a signal that your plans are not sound, rebuild those plans, and set sail once more toward your coveted goal.”

Napoleon Hill

“The quality of a man’s life is in direct proportion to his commitment to excellence, regardless of his chosen field of endeavor.”

Vince Lombardi Jr.

Some Thoughts From Michael Mauboussin On Process

“We have no control over outcomes, but we can control the process. Of course, outcomes matter, but by focusing our attention on process, we maximize our chances of good outcomes.”

Michael Mauboussin

“A thoughtful investment process contemplates both probability and payoffs and carefully considers where the consensus – as revealed by a price – may be wrong. Even though there are also some important features that make investing different than, say, a casino or the track, the basic idea is the same: you want the positive expected value on your side.”

Michael Mauboussin

Some Thoughts On Process From Various Authors

“How you climb a mountain is more important than reaching the top.”

Yvon Chouinard

“I’m interested in the moment when two objects collide and generate a third. The third object is where the interesting work is.”

Bruce Mau

“The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and something else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.”

Chuck Close

“Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone.”

Alan W. Watts

“I am enthusiastic over humanity’s extraordinary and sometimes very timely ingenuity. If you are in a shipwreck and all the boats are gone, a piano top buoyant enough to keep you afloat that comes along makes a fortuitous life preserver. But this is not to say that the best way to design a life preserver is in the form of a piano top. I think that we are clinging to a great many piano tops in accepting yesterday’s fortuitous contrivings as constituting the only means for solving a given problem.”

R. Buckminster Fuller