Books Of Interest, November 24, 2013

I ran across these from several sources and I put them on my to read list:

The Compatibility Gene      Daniel M. Davis

This was recommended by Bill Bryson in www.theguardian.com in their November 22, 2013 online issue and takes the reader on a six decade journey involving numerous scientists and through the history of transplants and immunology. Compatibility genes, according to the author, may affect the choice of partners, the connections between the nervous system and immune system as well as how pregnancy is possible.

Into The Silence     Wade Davis

This was recommended by Stephen Frears in www.theguardian.com in their Friday, November 22, 2013 online issue and details how British climbers including George Mallory tackled Mt. Everest in the 1920’s through new details, letters and diaries. The author spent over ten years bringing all this material together to write this book.

Mt Everest aerial 2005

Mt Everest aerial 2005 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Promised Land: The Triumph And Tragedy Of Israel     Ari Shavit

This was recommended in The New York Times Book Review of November 24, 2013 and the author tackles the crises as well as the pressures, both internal and external, that Israel is facing and how its history has played a part in explaining where they are today.

If Mayors Ruled The World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities     Benjamin R. Barber

This was recommended in The New York Times Book Review of November 24, 2013 and the author explores that our world with all the problems we are facing are best handled by cities rather than nations. The author shows that cities are better equipped to handle these problems because of indifference to borders, pragmatism, cooperation and participation.

Exodus: How Migration Is Changing Our World     Paul Collier

This was recommended in The Atlantic in the November, 2013 issue and the author relates this from several perspectives: from the migrants viewpoint, from the people the migrant’s leave behind and also from the countries in which they migrate.  The author shows that even though migration is simple economically, it does have immense complex effects.

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